Browsing: global warming

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How Warmer Water in the Gulf of Maine is Affecting Lobstermen, for Better and for Worse

Here’s a dramatic video-story from The Washington Post about how the warming waters in the Gulf of Maine are changing people’s lives and disrupting economies there, for better or worse. The Continental U.S. is 1.8 degrees F warmer now than it was a century ago; seas on the coasts are nine inches higher. Water in the Gulf of Maine is warming faster than water in 99 percent of the world’s oceans, changing patterns of marine life, particularly for lobster fisheries, and upsetting a way of life that many families enjoyed for generations. “There’s no doubt things are changing,” one lobsterman…

Cruising Life
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Want To Cruise on the Rhine? Don’t Wait Too Long. It’s Drying Up

Thinking about taking a cruise down the Rhine? Don’t wait too long; it’s drying up. Indeed, water levels on the Rhine, one of the most important rivers in Europe, if not the world, hit 12-year lows last summer, with low points continuing up to the end of the year. At shallow points, river traffic ground to a halt for a month. The source of the Rhine lies high in the Swiss Alps; the river then runs through Switzerland, Germany and the Netherlands, before emptying into the sea at Rotterdam. It runs past medieval castles, hillside vineyards, and throbbing industrial centers…

Cruising Life
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A Climate Crisis in the Galapagos Starts To Change Life There

Climate change, a combination of warming ocean water and the storms caused by El Niño, is threatening the unique sea and land life in the Galápagos Islands that inspired Charles Darwin and his theory of evolution. As a result, life on the Galápagos is changing, often in ways that have not been seen before. The Galápagos, which lie 846 miles west of Ecuador, are at the intersection of three major ocean currents. They also are in the cross hairs of El Niño , one of the world’s most destructive patterns, which causes rapid and extreme ocean heating across the tropics…

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On Watch

New UN Report on Global Warming: “Quite a Shock.” If Temperatures Keep Rising, Say Goodbye to Coral Reefs, the Maldives By Peter A. Janssen The United Nations just released a major report on global warming, painting a darker picture of the consequences of rising temperatures than scientists had previously thought. The report, by hundreds of scientists around the world and endorsed by 180 nations, “is quite a shock,” said Bill Hare, the author of earlier Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports and a physicist. The consequence are particularly dire for coral reefs, which are vital to supporting ocean life. Warmer…

Cruising Life
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Maine Lobstermen Taking Hits from Warming Waters, Trade Wars

Lobstermen in Maine are taking a double hit these days, one from global warming, the other from the impending trade wars. Both can have long-term consequences for an industry that accounts for half a billion dollars a year. Water temperature in the Gulf of Maine has been rising since the early 1980s, as a result of global warming. Until recently, this was a good thing, with lobsters – and the entire lobster industry – thriving. But now we may be on the downward cusp of too much of a good thing. The waters are getting too hot and lobsters are…

Cruising Life
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New Report: Ice Melting Faster Than Ever in Antarctic, Sea Level Rising

Ice is melting faster in the Antarctic than scientists had predicted. Indeed, the ice sheet is melting an a rapidly increasing rate, and has tripled in just the past ten years. This ice melt has poured more than 200 billion tons of ice into the ocean each year. It also has raised sea levels half a millimeter each year. These are the basic findings of a new study by a team of 80 Antarctic experts from 14 countries, as reported in The Washington Post. The scientists are worried about rising sea levels in low-lying cities and communities if the rate…

Cruising Life
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Largest Dead Zone in the World (Where Ocean Does Not Have Enough Oxygen to Support Life) Found in Gulf of Oman

The largest ocean dead zone in the world, larger than the state of Florida, has just been found in the Gulf of Oman, a strait bordered by Iran, Pakistan, Oman and the UAE, measuring about 63,700 square miles. The dead zone is not only the largest but also the thickest in the world, according to researchers from the University of East Anglia, who studied the area for eight months, using underwater Seaglider robots to feed data to satellites. The scientists had last measured the gulf in the 1990s, and now report a “dramatic increase” in the size and severity of…

Cruising Life
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New Study: Ship Traffic and Fishing Boats Moving Closer to North Pole Every Year. Now Transiting Treacherous Northwest Passage in February

Melting sea ice in the Arctic means that the fabled Northwest Passage, the sea route over the top of the world linking the Atlantic and the Pacific that has trapped explorers and frustrated mariners for hundreds of years, is opening up. Now a new study using 120 million data points tracking ship traffic there over seven years shows exactly how much and how fast the area is changing. Indeed, it found that the center of ship activity in the Arctic moved 186 miles closer to the North Pole from 2009 to 2016. Researchers from Tufts University and the Woods Hole…

Cruising Life
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A Weakening Gulf Stream, and Rising Sea Levels, Mean More Trouble for the New England Coast

A weaker Gulf Stream, combined with overall global warming, could mean a lot of trouble for the coast of New England, according to this well-documented story from Weather Underground meteorologist Bob Henson.  The New England coast already has been hit hard by storms and surging high water (see the picture of Scituate, Massachusetts, above) in the past few months. Two nor’easters earlier this month produced two of the three highest water levels ever recorded in Boston Harbor, and things could get worse. A basic problem is that the sea level along the Northeast coast is rising faster than it is…

Cruising Life
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Heading for the North Pole? Take a Sweater

This is usually the coldest time of the year at the North Pole, where the sun won’t rise until March 20. But recently there’s been a historic thaw. Indeed, last weekend the temperature rose above freezing, to 35 degrees, at the pole. Scientists have recorded what they call a warm air intrusion through the central Arctic this winter. In the area north of 80 degrees latitude, temperatures are 36 degrees above normal. Such intrusions have become more frequent and more intense. There were only four between 1980 and 2010, but now there have been four in the past five years.…

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