Browsing: Cruising Life

Cruising Life
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Problems with Your Diesel? Here’s a Great Guide on How To Diagnose and Fix Them

Do you know what to do if your diesel exhaust suddenly turns grey? Or the engine loses power? Or overheats? Even if you do, here’s one of the best and most thorough stories I’ve seen about how to diagnose and fix most problems with a diesel engine. It’s great as a primer, if you’re new to diesels, and as a refresher, if you’re an old hand. And it covers all the bases, including how to bleed air from the injectors, drain a filter, and change an impeller. The graphics are clear and easy to understand. Take a look: http://www.yachtingmonthly.com/sailing-skills/diagnose-and-fix-marine-diesel-engine-problems-29940

Boat Reviews
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New, Innovative, Fun and Fast Walker Bay Generation 525. See Review and Video

It’s hard to fit the new Walker Bay Generation 525 into a narrow boat category, because this new, luxurious 17-footer offers so much: It’s a RIB, certainly, but it also can be a sport boat, a day boat, a tow boat, a runabout or even a megayacht tender. It would be fun to have the 525 just to zip around a harbor by yourself, or to take a crowd – the boat’s rated for ten passengers. A California company (located in Fairfield, about half-way between San Francisco and Sacramento), Walker Bay is known for its innovation and creative design. Indeed,…

Cruising Life
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Monster 63-foot Wave Measured in Southern Ocean 400 Miles South of New Zealand

The southern-most wave buoy in the Southern Ocean, some 400 miles south of New Zealand, just recorded a monster 63.6-foot wave, four times the height of a single-story house. “This is one of the largest waves recorded in the Southern Hemisphere,” says Oceanographer Tom Durrant. The wave buoy was just recently moored in 492 feet of water about six miles south of Campbell Island,  pictured above, in a joint effort by the New Zealand Defense Force and MetOcean Solutions, to get accurate readings of wave and air-sea interactions in that remote part of the world. So far, wave heights from…

Boat Reviews
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Sabre 66 Flybridge Sea Trial Video: 29.2 Knots WOT

Even with its flybridge, the Sabre 66 Dirigo maintains a sleek, low profile, and the Maine-built beauty also performs on the water. We’ve written about the boat before, and I cruised on hull number one in northern Florida more than a year ago, but now Sabre has released a video of the flybridge boat’s initial sea trials in Penobscot Bay. The flagship of the Sabre fleet, the flybridge 66 cruises at 24.6 knots, and is a quiet boat, registering only 68 dB(A) at the helm; at its top speed of 29.2 knots, it registers only 70 dB(A).  On board the…

Boat Reviews
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New 2018 Ranger Tugs 27 with 300-hp Yamaha Outboard Power

As more evidence of the increasing move to outboard power, Ranger Tugs just introduced its 2018 R-27 with a single Yamaha F300 outboard, opening up the cockpit a bit, adding to the boat’s overall length, and certainly producing a bump up in speed. We don’t have any performance details yet, but we do know that the shift to an outboard will appeal to a portion of Ranger’s potential market that wanted some more juice. The Kent, Washington-based company will still offer the popular R-27 with a standard 200-hp Volvo D3 diesel. Over the years, I’ve cruised on Ranger Tugs in…

Cruising Life
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Will a Floating Container Sink Your Boat? Here are the Odds…

They’re everywhere on oceans around the world. Big and small container ships, going in every direction, some new and looking seaworthy, many less than new and looking less than seaworthy. Officials estimate that there are 5 to 6 million containers on ships at any given time; 10,000 of them wash overboard every year. If you’re cruising at night or in fog, you probably won’t even see one in your path; if the container is floating just under the surface, or covered by a wave, you probably won’t see it in any time of day. Here’s a great story, including some…

Cruising Life
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Restoring Gelcoat: Tips from Pros (And Watch Those Corners)

Nothing is more disheartening than that faded-gelcoat look on a boat, particularly when it’s your boat. Time for a work order and a check at the yard (yikes, not another one!), or some elbow grease of your own. Because while a dull, faded hull is embarrassing, a bright, shiny, new-looking hull is a matter of great pride, something to aim for. Here are some tips from pros on how to get there, how to breathe new life into your old topsides, with great advice on everything from rubbing compounds to wet sandings to avoiding going too deep on thin-gelcoat areas…

Cruising Life
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Top Ten Boat Names, and What They Say About You

BoatU.S. just released its annual top ten list of boat names, carrying on a 25-year tradition. It has some old favorites, Andiamo, Freedom (hard to beat that one for overall patriotism) and Seas the Day. The new number one, Serenity, certainly relates to feelings of calm and quiet (probably not an apt name on a boat someone is docking for the first time), while ending the list at number ten is Firefly (hmmm). BoatU.S. got the names by adding up requests for new names from BoatU.S. Graphics. They also had some fun by defining what each name means, at least…

Cruising Life
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Barge Crushes Loop Boat at Dock on ICW in Virginia, but Boat Owner Says She’ll Start Again

This is a story about having a dream, suffering some incredibly bad luck, and planning a comeback in the face of adversity. In April, after three years of saving and planning, Susan Pellett left her home in Riverview, Florida, just south of Tampa, to start the Great Loop on SuzieQ, her 1985, 21-foot Sport Craft.  Now, on a rainy Friday morning in May, she was walking up the long face dock at the Atlantic Yacht Basin, a large, full-service marina at mile 12 of the Intracoastal Waterway in Chesapeake City, Virginia. “I was 42 days into my Loop trip single-handed,”…

Cruising Life
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6 Gems of Anegada: Reefs, Beaches, Lobsters and, oh, Shipwrecks

When Columbus first saw this low-lying coral atoll in the Caribbean Sea on his second voyage in 1493, he named it Anegada, meaning drowned island. The highest point then, and now, is only 28 feet above sea level. Anegada, about 14 miles northeast of Virgin Gorda in the British Virgin Islands, now has some waterfront restaurants and beach bars, but the 15-square-mile island really hasn’t change all that much. It is still virtually surrounded by Horseshoe Reef (accounting for 300 shipwrecks), which protects miles and miles of secluded white sand beaches. One of the best, Cow Wreck Beach, is home…

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